« Back to all events

Re-Specifying the Relationship between Human Values and Attitudes to Immigration

Dates:
  • Tue 13 Feb 2018 17.15 - 18.30
  Add to Calendar 2018-02-13 17:15 2018-02-13 18:30 Europe/Paris Re-Specifying the Relationship between Human Values and Attitudes to Immigration

Psychologists repeatedly have attempted to chart fundamental, stable human values that are expected to vary between individuals and successfully predict attitudes and behaviours. In this paper, I use one of the most empirically efficacious of these value systems—Schwartz’s ten basic personal values—to predict attitudes to immigration in Europe. Previous attempts to do so have collapsed the ten values into two dimensions, as proposed by Schwartz when charting the values in the abstract. However, in this paper I show that the dimensional approach mis-specifies the relationship between values and attitudes to immigration. I do this using 2014 European Social Survey data in 21 countries. In fact, only four of the values—‘universalism’, ‘conformity’, ‘tradition’ and ‘security’—have strong effects on attitudes to immigration, with the other six values having either minimal or, in the case of five, no effect at all. This undermines previous findings that such values as ‘benevolence’ affect attitudes to immigration, as well as the assumption that each of these values’ anti-poles in Schwartz’s theoretical model should have equal but opposite effects. I then show that this pattern is largely consistent across countries and that the pattern holds true both when the dependent variable is positivity towards accepting immigrants and positive perception of the effects of immigration. Overall, though values predict attitudes to immigration consistently and powerfully, they do not do so according to Schwartz’s theoretical model of relations amongst values, of higher order value types or according to bipolar value dimensions, as previously assumed.

Seminar Room 4, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 4, Badia Fiesolana

Psychologists repeatedly have attempted to chart fundamental, stable human values that are expected to vary between individuals and successfully predict attitudes and behaviours. In this paper, I use one of the most empirically efficacious of these value systems—Schwartz’s ten basic personal values—to predict attitudes to immigration in Europe. Previous attempts to do so have collapsed the ten values into two dimensions, as proposed by Schwartz when charting the values in the abstract. However, in this paper I show that the dimensional approach mis-specifies the relationship between values and attitudes to immigration. I do this using 2014 European Social Survey data in 21 countries. In fact, only four of the values—‘universalism’, ‘conformity’, ‘tradition’ and ‘security’—have strong effects on attitudes to immigration, with the other six values having either minimal or, in the case of five, no effect at all. This undermines previous findings that such values as ‘benevolence’ affect attitudes to immigration, as well as the assumption that each of these values’ anti-poles in Schwartz’s theoretical model should have equal but opposite effects. I then show that this pattern is largely consistent across countries and that the pattern holds true both when the dependent variable is positivity towards accepting immigrants and positive perception of the effects of immigration. Overall, though values predict attitudes to immigration consistently and powerfully, they do not do so according to Schwartz’s theoretical model of relations amongst values, of higher order value types or according to bipolar value dimensions, as previously assumed.


Location:
Seminar Room 4, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Maureen Lechleitner (EUI) - Send a mail

Speaker:
James Dennison (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Organiser:
Reto Bürgisser (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Sophia Hunger
 
 

Similar events

 

Page last updated on 10 November 2016